Report: Freemason Berlusconi’s `Slavish’ Courtship of Freemason Qaddafi Haunts Italy

Bloomberg News Feb 23, 2011

Berlusconi’s `Slavish’ Courtship of Qaddafi Haunts Italy By Flavia Krause-Jackson

Berlusconi shut down the city’s biggest park in June 2009 to allow the visiting Libyan leader and his entourage of all- female bodyguards to set up camp by the 16th-century Villa Doria Pamphili. A year earlier, Italy agreed to pay $5 billion over 25 years to its former colony in reparations.

“With hindsight, the more slavish manifestations of deference could have been avoided,” Franco Pavoncello, a politics professor at John Cabot University in Rome, said in a telephone interview. “He went out of his way, more than others, to be best friends with Qaddafi. He can’t exactly take it all back now.”

Libya has invested in Italian companies including Fiat SpA, UniCredit SpA and the Juventus soccer team, while Eni SpA has been present in the North African country for half a century, leaving Italy reliant on Libya for a quarter of its crude oil. As his ties with Qaddafi developed, Berlusconi built on that economic legacy, which is now unraveling and underscores the cost of doing business with autocratic regimes.

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Further Reading: http://freemasonrywatch.org

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State of Israel’s foreign policy has depended on regional masonic alliances since Colonial French North Africa era in 1950’s: Report

Jan. 29, 2011 Haaretz

Without Egypt, Israel will be left with no friends in Mideast

Without Egypt’s Mubarak and with relations with Turkey in shambles, Israel will be forced to court new potential allies.

By Aluf Benn

Wikipedia: Suzanne Mubarak, Honorary President of Rotary Clubs of Egypt, has received the Paul Harris Fellowship Award several times. Her son Gamal Mubarak, said to be his father’s successor as the next president of Egypt, is also an Honorary Rotarian.

The fading power of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s government leaves Israel in a state of strategic distress. Without Mubarak, Israel is left with almost no friends in the Middle East; last year, Israel saw its alliance with Turkey collapse.

From now on, it will be hard for Israel to trust an Egyptian government torn apart by internal strife. Israel’s increasing isolation in the region, coupled with a weakening United States, will force the government to court new potential allies.

Israel’s foreign policy has depended on regional alliances which have provided the country with strategic depth since the 1950s. The country’s first partner was France, which at the time ruled over northern Africa and provided Israel […]

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